How to Make Banh Chung

Banh chung is a savory rice cake heavy with history and heavier still with sticky rice. It’s traditionally eaten around Tet holiday, Vietnam’s Lunar New Year, and is known as the dish that brings families together. Making banh chung can be a laborious task, one which takes many hours and requires the help of several people. The story of banh chung is repeated each year during the making of the dish, bringing families together over this legendary tale.

The story goes that when King Hung Vuong had to pick his successor, he asked each of his 18 sons to prepare a dish worthy of an offering to the ancestors. The princes sourced the rarest and finest ingredients for their dishes, knowing that the best dish would procure the throne. The youngest son Lieu, however, lived a modest existence in the countryside and, inspired by a dream, invented a humble dish. Using rice, mung beans and pork, Lieu created a round cake to symbolize the sky and a square cake to symbolize the earth by wrapping the ingredients in leaves from the forest. The simple dish won him the throne and a place in Vietnam’s rich tradition.

 

Making Banh Chung is a challenging endeavour and can take the better part of a weekend. We don’t expect you to actually make it, but the recipe below will give you an idea of how much work goes into it, making it all the more delicious to eat. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how it’s made:

Ingredients:

Gelatinous rice (soaked overnight)

Fatty pork

Sea salt

Cold water

White onion

Mung beans (soaked overnight)

Black pepper

Banana leaves (fresh or frozen)

Fish sauce

Preparation for the night before:

  1. Soak the bamboo leaves in a large roasting pan, keeping them submerged with a plate or bowl.
  2. Soak the rice in water and let it sit overnight.
  3. Rinse the mung beans under cold water, then soak in cold water overnight.

 Cooking for the day after:

Finely slice the onion and fry on a medium heat until caramelized. This will take around 30-40 minutes.

While the onions are frying, boil the mung beans in a pot with just enough water to cover. Bring to a boil then reduce to simmer, stirring occasionally for around 20-30 minutes until soft. Once they’ve reached a desirable consistency, mash to a paste and add 1tsp salt, 1tsp pepper and half the fried onion.

Season the soaked rice with 1tsp salt and the pork with ½ tsp salt, fish sauce, 1.5tsp pepper and the shallots.

Spread mashed mung beans onto saran wrap, adding a few pieces of pork, and wrap it into a square.

Lay two sheets of partially overlapping banana leaves and add a cup of rice into the centre. Place mung beans and pork on top of the rice and then cover with another cup. Fold tightly into a square, ensuring no content slips. Consider folding another banana leaf on top if you’re worried about it not being tight enough. Make sure no water penetrates into the cake when cooking.

Bring a large pot of water to the boil, adding the cakes and topping with a heavy object to make sure they stay submerged. Simmer for around 6-8 hours, adding more water as required. This is usually done overnight.

Once the cakes feels plump and the rice feels congealed, unwrap the cakes and cut into wedges to serve. Eat with pickled onions, pickled vegetables or fish sauce.

 So, there you have it! Ready to make your own?

Hanoi’s Edible Essentials

So much to eat but so little time. Hanoi is full of great dishes, but here are four you simply can’t do without. Grab a chair, pull out the chopsticks, and dig in.

 Bun Cha

 This dish is probably best known in the West for its cameo in Barak Obama’s Hanoi trip and meal out with Vietnam food fanatic Anthony Bourdain. Bun Cha is a hearty meal comprising rice noodles, grilled pork patties, pork belly, fresh herbs, and a rich sweet and sour broth.

It’s Hanoi’s favorite lunchtime dish, and with good reason. The best bun cha should come accompanied with fried spring rolls, especially those that are stuffed with crab. This is harder to find than you might think, but you can tuck into a delicious bowl of bun cha with a side dish of crab spring rolls at Ngon Villa.

 Pho Bo

 It’s hard to talk about Vietnam without mentioning pho (pronounced like “fur”). It’s a dish, like many, that has a variety of flavors across the country. Ask someone in the south who does the best pho and they’ll say the south, ask someone in the north and, well, you get the idea.

Consisting of rice noodles, thinly sliced beef, and beef broth, pho is a canvas for you to paint. Garlic lovers can add their own garlic. if you’re a fan of citrus, a squeeze of lime with give you your desired tastes. And anyone looking for a kick can beef their dish up with a jar of chilli. You’ll find Hanoi’s tastiest beef broth at Home Restaurant.

 Cha Ca

 Cha ca is a dish so beloved in Hanoi that it has a street named after it. Once the freshly caught fish is thrown into the pot, which resonates in the centre of your table, an explosion of herbs will wash over you.

If you ask a Hanoi local which way they prefer to eat cha ca, they’ll likely attest to the unique flavors of mam tom – though it must be said, mam tom is something of an acquired taste. Visitors to Vietnam may, instead, prefer to enjoy this dish with fish sauce of soy sauce.

You’ll find Home Restaurant’s “grilled catch-of-the-day with Hanoi’s herbs and rice paper roll” to be one of the most authentic versions of the dish available in Hanoi.

Che    

Che, which, in Vietnamese simply means desert, comes in many varieties. There is che with mung beans (che ba mau), che with black beans (che dau den), which is one of the most popular varieties in northern Vietnam, a jelly che called che thach or any number of fruit, jelly, bean or dumpling rice variety.

Che can be hot or che can be cold. It can be a sweet beverage, a dessert soup, or a pudding. Needless to say, che can be a lot of things.

If you want to try a truly delicious and unique che, head to Home Moc for the coffee jelly and almond che. It’s a hit with locals and foreigners alike.

Vietnam’s Top 10 Street Food Dishes

Vietnamese food has seen rocketing popularity in recent years, and it all starts with what was traditionaly found on the street. Here are ten unmissable dishes that you’d be a fool to miss when traveling through Vietnam.

Bun Cha

With roots in Vietnam’s capital, bun cha slowly made its way into the rest of the country. While there are many similar dishes throughout the rest of Vietnam, like Saigon’s bun thit nuong, nothing beats the original. A hearty broth, with rice noodles, grilled pork patties, pork belly, and fresh herbs, this dish is usually paired with nem (see below for more on nem). Try a bowl at Ngon Villa in Hanoi.

Phở (Hanoi)

Pho (pronounced like “fur”) is Vietnam’s most famous dish, so it should come as no surprise that there’s a bit of division in tastes around the country. Hanoi pho is balanced, hearty, and relies on the flavors created from hours of boiling beef or chicken bones. Give Hanoi’s pho a go at Home Restaurant in Hanoi.

Banh My

Some people say that when the French were kicked out of Vietnam, they left their bread behind. A popular lunch option for anyone who likes to eat on the go, banh my is a small baguette stuffed full of meat, herbs and vegetables. Try the banh my Quang Nam in Danang’s Home restaurant.

Cao Lau

While cao lau may not be such a commonplace dish throughout the rest of the country, you won’t be able to move for cao lau in Hoi An. The dish has deep ties to the city, with Dutch, Chinese, Japanese and Indian traders gorging on bowls of it in Hoi An’s ancient seaport as far back as the 17th century. Try a traditional bowl of cao lau in Hoi An’s Ngon Villa.

Banh Xeo

Like many of Vietnam’s meals, banh xeo can be a different affair in different parts of the country. In the northern provinces, people wrap their banh xeos, filled with pork and beansprouts, in rice paper, while further south banh xeo is commonly consumed with seafood, fish sauce, chillies and peanut sauce. They’re also smaller and might be wrapped in fresh greens, or served completely naked. Try Danang’s version at Ngon Villa’s Danang residence.

Mi Quang

This traditional central dish comprises of a soft, chewy noodle, made fresh on a daily basis, stuffed full of slices of moist roast pork, fresh lettuce, local mint, basil, garlic, and spring onion. Having originated in Quang Nam, mi quang adds some local specialities: shrimp, boiled quail eggs and crushed peanuts, topped with a savory broth. Get stuck into a bowl at Hoi An’s Ngon Villa.

Phở (Saigon)

While the differences between Saigonese and Hanoian pho noodles might seem minimal, the differences in the broth are vast. Unlike it’s northern counterpart, pho in Saigon is served with a huge array of sauces and herbs, like the usual lemon, chilli, soy, mint and cilantro, but also rice paddy herbs, sawtooth herbs, bean sprouts, basil and even hoisin sauce. You can try some at The Chopsticks, Saigon.

Bun Bo Hue

This is a street food dish originating from the central Vietnamese city of Hue, the Imperial City that stood as the capital of Vietnam from 1802 to 1945. This hearty bowl of broth comes with an array of flavors, starting with pork and beef bones, then a squeeze of lime, herbs, lemongrass, annatto and shrimp paste, with some crab cakes thrown in for good measure.

Hu Tieu

While its appearance may be similar to that of pho, the ingredients that go into hu tieu have differences that separate it significantly from its cousin. The dish simmers for hours on end in a mix of bones, dried squid, and rock sugar. Slow-cooked pork and fresh vegetables decorate the soup and, unlike pho, it can be served both in and outside of the broth.

 Nem  

While nem can have various meanings throughout the country, on this occasion we mean the delicious nem ran (if you’re in the north) or cha gio (if you’re in the south). These delicately fried spring rolls are a popular finger food at events like weddings, death anniversaries, and during Tet. Best of all, however, is a fried nem soaked in a bowl of bun cha. You can give this winning combination a go at Ngon Villa in Hanoi.

Top 10 Must-try Dishes in Vietnam

Vietnamese food is having something of a moment in the West – and for good reason. This unique cuisine crosses salty, sweet, and sour flavors for dishes that are distinct and unforgettable.

Vietnamese dishes are more than just pho though, with some of the best seafood in the world, along with rice noodles of every variety, we’re sure there’s something for everyone.

We’ve compiled a list of dishes that show off everything this country has to offer. Grab your chopsticks and dig in.

1.     Banh Xeo

Banh xeo is the pride of every major fishing port, including Danang and Hoi An. A mix of fresh greens, vermicelli noodles, and meats like chicken, pork, beef or, best of all, shrimp come together in a pancake made of rice flour, coconut milk and turmeric.

Head over to Ngon Villa Danang or Hoi An for a traditional, indulgent take on this Vietnamese staple.

2.     Cao Lau My

 This traditional dish shows off everything that Hoi An has to offer. In fact, it’s so distinct to Hoi An that, unless it is made with water from the local well, it isn’t really cao lau my.

The noodles that make up the base are one of the defining distinctions of this dish – yellow rice noodles that are unlike those you’ll find in the north. The well-seasoned bone broth is the perfect match of a variety of meats, herbs and local greens. Try a bowl of at Ngon Villa Hoi An.

3.     Com Ga Hoi An

Hoi An is known throughout the country for having the finest farm raised chicken and the tastiest yellow rice. That’s why we’ve named our com ga after Hoi An – just so everyone knows. The mix of pandan leaves, chicken stock and turmeric, along with the wood-fired clay ovens that it’s cooked in give it an unforgettable pale yellow hue. Come along to Ngon Villa Hoi An for a taste.

4.     Bun Cha

 This dish may be one of the most famous Vietnamese meals besides pho and banh mi and not just because Barak Obama and Anthony Bourdain sat down for a bowl.

A hearty meal good for summer and winter and a Hanoi specialty, made of rice noodles, grilled pork patties, pork belly, fresh herbs and a rich sweet and sour broth. Try yours with an absolutely essential side of nem cua be at Ngon Villa Hanoi.

5.     Pho Bo

 It would be surprising if you’ve come this far without hearing about pho – it’s probably the most famous Vietnamese dish out there. This hearty bowl starts with rice noodles, before thinly sliced beef and beef broth is added, followed by a mix of garlic, chilli or lime, flavored by you, to your taste buds. Visit Home Restaurant in Hanoi and try it for yourself.

6.     Cha Ca

 While mam tom, the signature sauce that is served with cha ca, is a point of division between locals and visitors to Hanoi, it’s worth noting that other sauces are available.

This fishy dish, that’s served in a pot in the centre of your table, can be eaten with fish sauce or soy sauce instead. Try the grilled ‘catch-of-the-day’ at Home restaurant in Hanoi.

7.     Che    

Dessert lovers can find a different sort of sweet tooth quencher in Vietnam. Che, which is the Vietnamese word for dessert, comes with some surprising ingredients.

Served with a range or beans, jelly, dumplings, sweet potato or fruit, which will surprise and delight even the most discerning of taste buds. Try a bowl of che with coffee jelly and almonds at Home Moc in Hanoi.

8.     Ca Kho To Mien Tay

In the south, there’s nothing better than stewed fish, caramelized and cooked in earthenware pots. While it may never get cold enough in Ho Chi Minh City to truly enjoy comfort food in a conventional way, there’s always a good opportunity to indulge in ca kho to Mien Tay – best served in Saigon’s own Home Finest.

9.     Vit Nuong Lu

Though it may seem like the farthest place in Vietnam to be influenced by Chinese cuisine, the traditional Chinese roast duck is one of the most popular foods in Saigon. A big dish when it comes to takeout and special occasions, roast duck can be found in Ho Chi Minh City’s Home Finest.

 10. Banh My

 While banh my may just mean ‘bread’ in Vietnamese, this popular lunch on the go is so much more than that. Stuffed full of fresh herbs and a range of meats or egg pate, the banh my is the pinnacle of Fresh inspired Vietnamese food. We believe the finest banh mys resonate in central Vietnam, so head to Ngon Villa Danang to try one for yourself.

Home, Home Finest, and Home Moc: An Introduction to Vietnam’s Top Restaurant Brand

While elements of these four restaurants may change, the philosophy that drives them will always remain the same: a dedication to bringing you the very best of Vietnam’s rich and varied cuisine.

To achieve this, we use only fresh produce from local vendors that have been handpicked by our expert chefs. We understand that the only way we will do justice to our recipes is to carefully monitor the ingredient supply.

When it comes to location, we make sure that the history of our buildings is as important as the stories of our food. That’s why, for each location, we choose unique and interesting French villas to inhabit, rather than letting them fall to ruin.

Home Hanoi & Home Hoi An

For Home Hanoi, we decided to nestle ourselves within one of our favorite corners of the city. Located inside a former French residence in Truc Bach, Home Hanoi is perfectly placed between the historic labyrinth of the Old Quarter and the expanse of West Lake. Each room inside of the restaurant is unique, and our outdoor tables encircle the detached mansion.

Home Hoi An is situated on one of the picturesque walking streets of the Old Town, just a few steps from the historic Japanese Bridge. The restaurant teems with history, as this building was one of the original terraced houses with plenty of period features.

Our menu combines traditional Vietnamese cuisine with modern high-end cooking techniques, which, when crafted with local, hand-picked produce, creates indulgent and authentic Vietnamese food. Within all of our food, along with our obsession with authenticity, we hope to reflect a proud, rich culture in the food hubs of Hanoi and Hoi An.

Home Moc

With a growing international reputation for fantastic food that is at once sweet, spicy and rich, Hanoi is becoming a major influencer in the world’s food scene. When it comes to Home Moc, we’re leading the way for traditional Hanoian food, with a focus on the most exquisite seafood available on the market.

Dining at Home Moc is like taking a trip through time. We anchor ourselves in the roots of our past, with dishes that are full of local tradition and well-kept family secrets. We ensure that, when you leave Home Moc, you’ll feel as though you’ve tried the very best of Vietnamese cuisine.

Home Finest

Offering the next level in restaurant experiences, our Saigon restaurant strives to create the finest in authentic Vietnamese cuisine in the southern metropolis. There are key features that make up any meal in Saigon, including crisp salad, fresh seafood, and meat so tender that it falls off the bone. We achieve such high standards by making sure our executive chef personally chooses all the highest quality produce available, all of which is organic and free range where available.

Our location lives within the heart of Saigon’s historic District 3, surrounded by colonial architecture and important landmarks. The building itself is full of intimate balconies, terraces, and secluded enclaves. Home finest lives up to its name by providing a choice of a la carte and set menus, along with a completely unique Vietnamese afternoon tea.

Planning a Party for New Year’s Eve?

When it comes to New Year’s Eve celebrations, we understand that not everyone likes the same thing. Some people will relish in a roaring party, while others enjoy a more modest celebration. With a combination of our festive menus and a range of private rooms and floors, we’ve ensured that there’s something for everyone in Hanoi, Hoi An, Danang, and Saigon.

With a range of upscale private dining rooms across our Home, Ngon Villa and The Chopsticks restaurants, and an array of menu options including wines and signature cocktails to choose from, you’ll be able to ring in the New Year in style. We also have expert staff that take great pleasure in helping you curate the perfect party on hand to make sure 2018 is seen off without any problems.

We’ve got an exclusive menu running for the festive season. From 15th December 2018 to 31st January 2019, diners can indulge in a special 7-course menu, which includes lobster cooked just the way you like it and an additional 90-minute free flow drinks package also available. For those interested in something a little different, you can dine on the set menu that Dmitry Medvedev had during his visit to Home Mộc restaurant earlier this year.

Home Finest Saigon

This renovated art deco style villa is the perfect location for a chic New Year’s Eve party draped in class. The dark, earthy tones and navy hues make Home Finest one of the most tastefully decorated places to throw a New Year’s bash in Saigon, with floors of intimate balconies, terraces, secluded enclaves, relaxing water features, and lush greenery, a party here can be bold yet personal. We have private rooms with a capacity of 30 guests, private floors, which can accommodate 55 guests, and a full restaurant for up to 100.

Home Moc Hanoi

At Home Moc, we’ve taken a classic villa and maintained all of its rich personality to bring an elegant dining and party experience. While the design may be French, Home Moc lives and breathes a Hanoi personality, with striking wooden design and furnishing. Throwing a bash at Home Moc is a guaranteed success, with private rooms able to accommodate small groups of 10 to larger teams of 40. Private floors ca accommodate 60 people, and the full restaurant can hold up to 180 guests.

The Chopsticks Saigon

The story of The Chopsticks couldn’t be more unique. Once the home of Mr Tran Van Huong, the Vice President of the Southern Vietnamese Government before 1975, The Chopsticks has maintained many of the original features of the villa. Visitors are met by wrought iron gates and windows and a garden entrance, followed by a sweeping staircase, earthy timber, and copious natural light.  Private rooms at The Chopsticks are personal, with 4 rooms of up to 8 guests each, along with long tables and enclaves. The private floors are open and can accommodate up to 40 guests, while the full restaurant can seat up to 140.

Home Hoi An

Whether it’s an intimate dinner party or grand celebratory banquet, Home does a great job of making you feel, well, at home. Nestled away in a stunning terraced house, well preserved for over a century, Home Hoi An is bathed in historic architectural features for feelings of tradition and homeliness. The authentic mood combined with the feeling of home makes Home Hoi An a perfect destination for parties, with a private floor able to accommodate 50 guests.

Ngon Villa, Danang

As an important French port in central Vietnam during the 19th century, it became awash with colonial buildings like catholic cathedrals and French villas. Sadly, very few still remain today. Ngon Villa sits inside one of the surviving French villas, and the Ngon Villa residence stands as beautiful as ever. A mix of red brick, bamboo, and lacquered wood make a novel east-west fusion. This charming residence has private rooms with the capacity to hold up to 40 guests, private floors for up to 60 guests, and a full restaurant for 180 guests.

What’s on at Viet Deli This Christmas

The halls have been sufficiently decked across all our Viet Deli restaurants, ready for a comfy Christmas and an extravagant New Year. There is something for everyone at Viet Deli in our Hanoi, Danang, Hoi An, and Saigon restaurants, with exclusive parties, special menus, and the coziest of atmospheres.

Exclusive Festive Menu

We’ve put together a fantastic festive menu exclusively for this festive season. From 15th December 2018 through to 31st January 2019, we’ve got a special 7-course dinner including lobster cooked just the way you like it at just 990,000VND (excluding tax and service charge).

To really get the party going, you can add a 90-minute free flow drinks package to the meal, which includes sparkling wines, reds and whites, and dessert wines, for 1,450,000VND (excluding tax and service charge).

 For those seeking something a little out of the ordinary this Christmas, we’ve put together the menu that Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev dined on during his visit to Home Moc restaurant.

Private Parties with Viet Deli

All of our restaurants have private dining rooms and complete floors available to book.  We’ve got upscale private dining areas across our Home, Ngon Villa, and The Chopsticks restaurants, all available with an array of wines and signature cocktails to help get the party started.

When it comes to party planning, we can’t help but get involved. That’s why we do our best to help you throw the best hootenanny around, with expert staff trained in the art of party-starting to make sure your event goes off in style.

Across the country we’ve got private rooms that can hold small groups of 6 and large teams of 30. Is your party bigger still? We have floors good for up to 60 guests.

Viet Deli: The Leading Upscale Vietnamese Restaurant Group

At Viet Deli, our family is big, but our vision is simple: outstanding Vietnamese cuisine, with one foot in the past and the other striving toward the future. With such a clear vision, it is easy to see why our restaurants are able to maintain such a consistent character throughout the country.

Each one of our restaurants has a clear and consistent design, with a shrewd eye for detail and a passion for historic preservation. Take The Chopsticks as an example: It was once the home of Mr Tran Van Huong, the Vice President of the Southern Vietnamese Government before 1975. At Viet Deli, we couldn’t see this slice of Vietnamese history go to ruin, so we decided to make it the residence for our hit restaurant The Chopsticks. We retained those beautiful wrought iron gates and windows, gorgeous garden entry, and sweeping staircase. Now, The Chopsticks is one of the most upscale restaurants in Saigon, and every diner who comes to visit us gets to experience this stunning piece of history.

This isn’t the end of our restoration projects though. All of our Ngon Villa and many of our Home restaurants are housed in beautifully maintained or restored French villas. Danang, an important port since the 19th century, has had heavy French influence, full of catholic cathedrals and French villas. Sadly, much of this beautiful architecture has now fallen away. But at Ngon Villa in Danang, we made it our mission to maintain one of these stunning French villas. We’ve created a charming East-West fusion with red brick, bamboo, and lacquered wood, ensuring a memorable atmosphere for every customer.

Authentic Vietnamese cuisine is a striking part of our personality here at Viet Deli. Authentic Vietnamese cuisine, however, is not a one-size-fits-all term. We know that the difference between northern, central, and southern cuisine is vast, as demonstrated simply by the differences in a bowl of pho. We work closely with our highly trained local chefs to get the best out of local recipes, so customers will be able to have a bowl of bun cha in the north, cao lau in the center, and ca kho to in the south.

The defining factor of a Viet Deli restaurant, however, is the quality to which we make all of our food. Yes, it’s authentic. And yes, it delivers the taste of the region. But it’s the fresh local ingredients brought straight from the farmers and our chefs’ dedication to high-end cuisine that separates us from other Vietnamese restaurant groups.

When it comes to quality, we don’t compromise.

Top Must-try Foods in Hanoi

So much to eat but so little time. Hanoi is full of great dishes, but here are four you simply can’t do without. Grab a chair, pull out the chopsticks, and dig in.

BUN CHA

This dish is probably best known in the West for its cameo in Barak Obama’s Hanoi trip and meal out with Vietnam food fanatic Anthony Bourdain. Bun Cha is a hearty meal comprising rice noodles, grilled pork patties, pork belly, fresh herbs, and a rich sweet and sour broth.

It’s Hanoi’s favorite lunchtime dish, and with good reason. The best bun cha should come accompanied with fried spring rolls, especially those that are stuffed with crab. This is harder to find than you might think, but you can tuck into a delicious bowl of bun cha with a side dish of crab spring rolls at Ngon Villa.

PHO BO

It’s hard to talk about Vietnam without mentioning pho (pronounced like “fur”). It’s a dish, like many, that has a variety of flavors across the country. Ask someone in the south who does the best pho and they’ll say the south, ask someone in the north and, well, you get the idea.

Consisting of rice noodles, thinly sliced beef, and beef broth, pho is a canvas for you to paint. Garlic lovers can add their own garlic. if you’re a fan of citrus, a squeeze of lime with give you your desired tastes. And anyone looking for a kick can beef their dish up with a jar of chilli. You’ll find Hanoi’s tastiest beef broth at Home Restaurant.

CHA CA

Cha ca is a dish so beloved in Hanoi that it has a street named after it. Once the freshly caught fish is thrown into the pot, which resonates in the centre of your table, an explosion of herbs will wash over you.

If you ask a Hanoi local which way they prefer to eat cha ca, they’ll likely attest to the unique flavors of mam tom – though it must be said, mam tom is something of an acquired taste. Visitors to Vietnam may, instead, prefer to enjoy this dish with fish sauce of soy sauce.

You’ll find Home Restaurant’s “grilled catch-of-the-day with Hanoi’s herbs and rice paper roll” to be one of the most authentic versions of the dish available in Hanoi.

CHE

Che, which, in Vietnamese simply means desert, comes in many varieties. There is che with mung beans (che ba mau), che with black beans (che dau den), which is one of the most popular varieties in northern Vietnam, a jelly che called che thach or any number of fruit, jelly, bean or dumpling rice variety.

Che can be hot or che can be cold. It can be a sweet beverage, a dessert soup, or a pudding. Needless to say, che can be a lot of things.

If you want to try a truly delicious and unique che, head to Home Moc for the coffee jelly and almond che. It’s a hit with locals and foreigners alike.

Check out the best authentic Vietnamese restaurants: Home Restaurants and Ngon Villa